Articulated lorries to be banned from the roads on Sundays – Cyprus Mail

In a bid to alleviate traffic during the summer, police on Friday banned articulated lorries from using motorways and other networks between certain times the next three Sundays of the month.

According to a statement, on July 12, 19, and 26, between 9am and 1pm and 4pm and 8pm, articulated lorries would be banned from using motorways as well as the Nicosia -Troodos, Limassol-Platres-Troodos, and Paphos-Polis roads.

Recently, because of the large number of cars on the network and two crashes, thousands of motorists were stuck on the highway for hours.

In addition, police would be stepping up its patrols during the weekend and carry out checks with special emphasis on offences considered the main causes of fatal accidents.

On Sundays, police will also issue frequent announcements regarding the state of the roads.

 

Source: Articulated lorries to be banned from the roads on Sundays – Cyprus Mail

Police urge motorcyclists to wear helmets – Cyprus Mail

Paphos police on Sunday appealed to motorbike users to wear helmets for their own safety.

Speaking after the death of a motorcyclist in Paphos early on Sunday morning, CID Paphos spokesman Michalis Ioannou said “we are making for one more time an appeal to motorcyclists to wear a helmet”.

Shortly before 5am on Sunday Evagoras Demetriou, 24, from Ayia Marina was driving home after a night out on the main road from Polis to his village when he lost control of the bike, which overturned leaving him on the pavement.

He was taken to Paphos general hospital where doctors confirmed his death.

Source: Police urge motorcyclists to wear helmets – Cyprus Mail

Driver arrested after refusing to stop, ramming police car – Cyprus Mail

Police arrested a 30-year-old man after he fled Bases police and attempted to evade state authorities in Limassol first thing on Saturday morning.

According to police, the 30-year-old, who had two passengers (18 and 16) in his car, failed to stop when signalled to do so by bases authorities. Instead, police said, he accelerated and intentionally hit a bases police car with two officers inside.

He then accelerated again and fled the scene, while police chased his vehicle and called for aid from the Republic of Cyprus authorities.

Upon entering the Republic of Cyprus areas in the Ypsonas area, police attempted to stop his vehicle again.

The 30-year-old refused and attempting to flee, he drove onto the opposite side of the road, where eventually he cashed into a 22-year-old’s car and one more police vehicle with two officers inside. He then hit into the same bases’ police car that was chasing him, a little further down the road, police said.

After hitting the vehicles, the 30-year-old’s car climbed onto the pavement, and then hit a tree, where it stopped.

All the drivers, the 22-year-old, the 30-year-old and his two passengers, and four officers in the police cars were injured and were taken to hospital.

Doctors determined the drivers were all lightly injured in the crashes, with the most serious injury being that of the 30-year-old, who fractured his hand.

All were discharged after receiving first aid, and the 30-year-old was arrested for a variety of traffic violations.

He refused to take an alcotest and narcotest.

 

Source: Driver arrested after refusing to stop, ramming police car – Cyprus Mail

Road deaths up 6.1% in Cyprus – Cyprus Mail

Cyprus ranks 18th in the EU in road deaths, according to the 14th annual Road Safety Performance Report published on Wednesday by the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC).

In 2019 there was an increase of 6.1 per cent in road deaths in Cyprus. There were 52 road deaths were recorded, three more than in 2018.

With last year’s increase, Cyprus has fallen one notch, from 17th to 18th place in the EU in deaths per capita.

A 3 per cent decrease was recorded overall in the EU in 2019.

Out of 32 countries monitored by the programme, 16 registered a decrease in road deaths in 2019 compared to 2018.

Luxembourg leads the ranking with a 39 per cent reduction in the number of road deaths between 2018 and 2019.15 It is followed by Sweden with a 32 per cent decrease, Estonia with 22 per cent and Switzerland with 20 per cent.

The number of road deaths increased in 12 countries, while progress stagnated in four. The largest increases were registered in Israel with 17 per cent, Denmark with 14 per cent, Slovenia with 12 per cent, Slovakia with 7 per cent and Lithuania and Cyprus with 6 per cent.

However, the report said annual numbers of deaths in Luxembourg and Malta are particularly small and are, therefore, subject to substantial annual fluctuation. Annual numbers of deaths in Cyprus and Estonia are also relatively small and, therefore, may be subject to considerable annual fluctuation.

This may explain why, though deaths in Cyprus increased, the number of seriously injured in road accidents in the country decreased.

The number of people recorded as seriously injured, based on national definitions, decreased in 18 out of 23 EU member states that collect data. However, in the EU23 collectively the progress in reducing serious road traffic injures remains insignificant since 2010.

Serious injuries recorded in Germany and the Netherlands increased and this has had a significant effect on the EU average as recorded serious injuries in these countries represent 48 per cent of all recorded serious injury data in the EU25.

The number of serious injuries increased by 45 per cent in Malta, by 13 per cent in the Netherlands, 11 per cent the UK and 9 per cent in Germany since 2010. At the other end of the ranking is Greece – it achieved the biggest decrease in the number of recorded serious injuries since 2010 with a 63 per cent reduction, followed by Cyprus with 42 per cent and Belgium with 35 per cent.

“It is now considered impossible to achieve the goal of reducing road deaths by 50 per cent from 2010 to 2020, as a reduction of 34.5 per cent is required this year, compared to 2019,” the report concluded.

“A reduction in road deaths is expected this year, of course, due to the restrictive measures taken to deal with the pandemic of Covid-19, but it is considered unlikely to be so great that it will achieve the goal. But even if that happens, it cannot be considered an achievement.”

Source: Road deaths up 6.1% in Cyprus – Cyprus Mail

LED-lighting the way by 2020 – Cyprus Mail

By Annette Chrysostomou

LED lights will likely replace all conventional street lights in Cyprus by 2020, way earlier than the global goal which is to have 90 per cent of street lighting in the form of LED lamps, senior manager at the Electricity Authority (EAC) Yiangos Frangoulides has said.

As they are around 80 per cent more efficient than the old lights, replacing the bulbs will not only reduce electricity consumption and thus air pollution, but is also great for maintenance, as LED lights last years longer than fluorescent lights.

Already, more than two-thirds of municipalities have changed the bulbs in their roads or are in the process of doing so. Five major municipalities in Nicosia have done so, with just two to go. Nicosia (centre) and Aglandjia chose to issue private tenders these two are still being reviewed by the tenders authority.

The others chose to make a direct agreement with the EAC. At the start of the project, the EAC asked for tenders and selected three to work with. They then offered the municipality various deals, as the situation in each place is somewhat different. All include an eight-year free maintenance, which is part of the arrangement with the suppliers.

As Frangoulides puts it, it is a win-win deal for the communities and municipalities and the electricity authority.

Since the EAC gains kilowatt hours, as less electricity is needed for the new lamps and thus less will be produced, it avoids to pay penalties for CO2 emissions which they would otherwise have to pay to the EU from 2020. They would have had to charge the customers more for this, which is also not going to happen.

At the same time, a municipality can save money as it has to pay less to the EAC. In the case of Larnaca, for example, the saving is €500,000 per year, which enables the local authorities to pay back the money they have spent for the new lighting in three years, after which they will simply save the money.

Replacement of road lighting in Larnaca is expected to begin at the end of December and to be completed by the end of May 2020.

Athienou has also this week announced the replacement of their street lights,

The total cost of the project will be €275,310. It is expected that the municipality will save approximately €100,000 during the eight-year maintenance period.

The entire amount will be covered by a loan approved by the European Investment Bank, with a low-interest rate, while the cost will be recovered in less than two years, the municipality said.

Strovolos has signed an agreement with the electricity authority as well and plans to make up for the money in three years.

Three Paphos municipalities have already replaced them, as have parts of Limassol including Germasoyia and Ypsonas.

A slightly different version, smart lighting, will be used for streets in Ayia Napa. This means lights obeys commands. They can be dimmed or switched off remotely any time of the day and night, which makes sense for a tourist resort which is much busier in some months than others. In winter, the municipality may decide to dim lights or leave them off in some roads altogether as less lighting is needed when few people are around.

This not only saves money, but also helps to reduce light pollution.

The International Dark Sky Association (IDA) estimates that least 30 per cent of all outdoor lighting in the US alone is wasted, mostly by lights that aren’t shielded.

“That adds up to $3.3 billion and the release of 21 million tonnes of carbon dioxide per year. To offset all that carbon dioxide, we’d have to plant 875 million trees annually,” the association calculated.

At the same time, incandescent and fluorescent lights attract night-migrating birds more than LED lights, leading them astray. The reduced direct and reflected up-light also means a reduction in urban sky glow.

Some 95 per cent of the lamps energy is converted into light and just 5 per cent wasted as heat. Since so little heat is emitted from the light source, this reduces their attractiveness to bugs.

Source: LED-lighting the way by 2020 – Cyprus Mail

TISPOL President promotes #ProjectEDWARD at Cyprus Road Safety Conference

TISPOL President Volker Orben spoke at a road safety conference in Cyprus, on Friday 28 June, organised by the delegation of the European Commission in Cyprus and the Cyprus Police, at the House of the European Union, in Nicosia.

Volker spoke about the mission of TISPOL, which is responsible for the coordination of activities at a European level, for the effective and efficient enforcement of traffic legislation as well as the implementation of road policing, a fundamental model for the prevention of criminality on the roads, which many European countries – including the Cyprus Police – adopted during the current decade.  

He highlighted the impact Project Edward can have on casualty reduction and awareness raising – while also stressing the utmost importance of enforcement in the sector of the respect of traffic legislation and the prevention of road deaths and serious injuries. In this respect, he presented the operational results of TISPOL.He stressed that TISPOL appreciates the fact that the European Commission established in 2018 a new Strategic Action Plan on Road Safety to halve road deaths by 2030 and he indicated the importance of the joint cross-border road traffic enforcement operations organized in cooperation between police bodies.

He explained that the target set by the European Commission of a 50 per cent reduction in road deaths and serious injuries by 2030 is an important commitment of TISPOL and a key issue, indicating that in the frame of their daily duties the members of TISPOL are called to exchange information and best practice on a constant basis, bearing in mind the Valetta Declaration. He thanked the Cyprus Police for their contribution in the road safety campaigns, which include enforcement and publicity of the actions undertaken, especially for speeding, drink and drug driving, distraction and the non-use of seat belts.

“Bike SAFE” motorcycle training program

Motorcyclists are trained by members of the Police

The risks that motorcyclists face in the road network and the ways in which they can predict and cope with them were the subject of a training program that was held yesterday 16/6/2019) at the Police Headquarters Department of Traffic Police. 

The program was attended by 15 civilian motorcyclists, who were briefed by trained members of the Special Motorcycle Squadron and the Police Driving School on the proper use of motorcycles on the road network, but also on how to prevent and deal with various dangers that lie ahead during driving. The training contained both theoretical information of the participants and practical training.

The “Bike Safe” training program is part of the general framework of the Police’s actions to inform and raise awareness of road safety and the prevention of traffic accidents. 

16/06/2019 08:58:00

Μοτοσικλετιστές εκπαιδεύονται από μέλη της Αστυνομίας

Οι κίνδυνοι που διατρέχουν στο οδικό δίκτυο οι μοτοσικλετιστές και οι τρόποι με τους οποίους οι ίδιοι μπορούν να τους προβλέψουν και να τους αντιμετωπίσουν, ήταν το αντικείμενο προγράμματος εκπαίδευσης, που πραγματοποιήθηκε χθες στο Τμήμα Τροχαίας Αρχηγείου Αστυνομίας. 

Το πρόγραμμα παρακολούθησαν 15 πολίτες μοτοσικλετιστές, οι οποίοι ενημερώθηκαν από εκπαιδευμένα μέλη του Ειδικού Ουλαμού Μοτοσικλετιστών και της Σχολής Οδηγών της Αστυνομίας, για την ορθή χρήση των μοτοσικλετών στο οδικό δίκτυο, αλλά και για το πώς μπορούν να προλαμβάνουν και να αντιμετωπίζουν διάφορους κινδύνους, που ελλοχεύουν κατά την οδήγηση. Η εκπαίδευση περιείχε τόσο θεωρητική ενημέρωση των συμμετεχόντων, όσο και πρακτική εξάσκηση.

Το εκπαιδευτικό πρόγραμμα «Bike Safe», εντάσσεται στο γενικότερο πλαίσιο των δράσεων της Αστυνομίας, για ενημέρωση και ευαισθητοποίηση του κοινού σχετικά με την οδική ασφάλεια και την πρόληψη των τροχαίων συγκρούσεων.